Cell Symposia: Functional RNAs
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Confirmed Speakers

Frédéric Allain, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Ben Blencowe, University of Toronto, Canada
Ronald Breaker, Yale University, USA
Marc Bühler, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Switzerland
Witold Filipowicz, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Switzerland
Antonio Giraldez, Yale University, USA
Rachel Green, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Narry Kim, Seoul National University, South Korea
Reinhard Lührmann, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Germany
Anna Pyle, Yale University, USA
Venki Ramakrishnan, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK
Peter Sarnow, Stanford University, USA
Phillip Sharp, M.I.T., USA
Gisela Storz, National Institutes of Health, USA
Haruhiko Siomi, Keio University, Japan
Bill Theurkauf, University of Massachusetts, USA
Jörg Vogel, University of Würzburg, Germany
Juan Valcarcel (co-organizer), Centre de Regulació Genòmica, Spain
James Williamson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Sarah Woodson, Johns Hopkins University, USA

Organizing Committee

Boyana Konforti, Editor, Cell Reports
Miao-Chih Tsai
, Scientific Editor, Molecular Cell
Juan Valcarcel, Centre de Regulació Genòmica, Spain

Biology has yielded many surprises, but one of the greatest has certainly been the discovery that the human genome encodes only ~20,000 protein-coding genes, representing <2% of the total genome. As if that were not enough, it turns out that 90% of the genome is actively transcribed. These RNAs are more than a collection of protein-coding genes and their splice variants. Instead, they are the result of extensive antisense, overlapping, and non-coding RNA expression. Although initially dismissed as spurious transcriptional noise, recent evidence suggests that the so-called "dark matter" of the genome may play major biological roles in cellular development and metabolism.

The goal of this symposium is to bring together researchers who are experts in RNA chemistry and biology with those who want to learn about RNA. The idea is to cover the basics in order to bring all participants quickly up to speed and then move on to the major questions in the field. The sessions will encompass a range of topics, such as the properties of RNA, RNA recognition and RNP assembly, and the function of RNPs in cellular development and disease. By providing ample time for questions and discussion, we hope that all participants will come away with a renewed appreciation for “life's indispensable molecule.”

Sponsors/Exhibitors

Thermo Scientific
abcam
antibodies-online

nanostring

Novus Biologicals

Zymo Research

Supporting Publications

Supporting Publications - Cell Reports

Supporting Publications - Molecular Cell